Tag: java

Is your brain dead?
A Gandhi Reader

Let’s take a few things from this blog post

Nihon Keizai O Chairudo Shokku Ga Osou: "Tei Shusseiritsu Jidai" Ni Ikinokoru Bijinesu Wa Aru Ka!? = Child Shock: Empty Cradles Spell Doom For The Japanese Economy (Japanese Edition)
on “Code Monkeyism” and discuss:

“Searching for java is dead with Google, one gets

Results 1 – 10 of about 8,620,000 for java is dead.

Dead indeed. Or at least lots of people think it is or will die 2009.”

OK, so, let’s see what other things we can search for on google and get more results than that:

If that was supposed to convince me of something you are sadly mistaken.

He then tries to define “dead”:

“What does it mean to be dead for a programming language? Perhaps that it is no longer the default choice for projects?”

He goes on to describe how many startups don’t use Java for new applications, and doesn’t say anything about new projects from other types of organizations.

The only large – and lets say profitable and growing – startup that uses Java is LinkedIn.

Apparently this guy knows the technology behind every startup in the world. How am I supposed to trust anything you say when there are statements like this throughout your post?

Later, he states that “Java is not dead”. But then, one paragraph later:

“But just because Java is not dead doesn’t mean it has a future.”

What’s the difference? On what time scale? 5 years? 25 years?

“Java is a none-hype.”

What does that mean? It makes it hard for me to take this post seriously when there are meaningless things written throughout it.

Java is not going anywhere anytime soon. It is used in thousands of applications globally. The development tools available to Java developers are unmatched in quality by any other language. To claim it is dead is just trying to provoke an argument.

I use Java every day at work. I’m not saying it’s the best language out there (far from it), just that its not going anywhere.

Anyways – do me a favor, blogosphere: make sense when you try to discuss these things.

tags: ,
Man's rule and Christ's reign. A sermon, preached on Thanksgiving Day, November 27th, 1862
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category: languages
comments: 33
Read Worlds; Jane's Hair
Disclaimer: Everything written here is my own opinion, not my employer's. #